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R U OK Konnect App Blog

Transform your smartphone into a positive wellbeing tool by downloading the R U OK? mobile app Konnect. This handy app encourages you to hit the pause button and make time for your friends and family, with the aim of boosting emotional wellbeing. 

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Our privacy is valuable. And now, more than ever, we need to protect it.

As a society, we are beginning to understand the consequences of sharing our personal information online. We are becoming increasingly concerned with how our data is being used and misused.

Advances in technology present new risks to our privacy and security. Spam, scams, identity theft and fraud are just some of the risks we face when we use our devices.

Privacy Awareness Week runs from the 13th to the 19th of May this year. It provides an opportunity to reflect on how we share and manage our personal data. The aim is to shine a spotlight on the issue of privacy, and to remind us that privacy does matter.

With this awareness has come growing concern for the privacy of children and young people online. So how do we keep them safe?

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Something happens when we go to school. Yes, we learn to read, we learn to write, to count, we learn about history, geography, languages, how our world works - all wondrous, valuable things. 

We also learn, very quickly, that learning is measured and should be tested, constantly. We learn that data drives schools and policies, and that one’s worth is often tied up in those final results. And in that, we lose our sense of play, of discovery, of creativity. Ken Robinson, in his seminal Ted Talk Do Schools Kill Creativity?, argues that our schooling systems are "educating people out of their creative capacities" and that we are not only growing out of our creativity, but "we get educated out of it’".  

Alongside this, schools are becoming increasingly aware of the need to nurture and implement wellbeing programs that foster agency, resilience and self-management strategies. When children are a part of a system, however, how can we do this?

Bullying Program

What a week! It all kicked-off with the National Day of Action against Bullying and Violence on Friday 16th March, followed by World Day of Theatre for Children on Tuesday 20th March and lastly Harmony Day on Wednesday 21st March.

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Friday the 16th of March is 2018 National Day of Action Against Bullying and Violence. This is a day for school communities to take a stand together, and demonstrate their commitment to creating a safe and supportive environment for all students. 

The Australian government is getting behind this initiative, in response to growing concern about the devastating impact of bullying on children and teens. This week Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Education Minister Simon Birmingham wrote a letter to every principal in the country, urging them to join the national effort against bullying and violence in schools. 

And the spotlight isn't only on schools - in recent weeks attention has been turned towards abuse and harassment occurring within Australian universities. 

It is clear that bullying is now on the national agenda.

So where do we go from here?

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